CSA Week 1: 4/30/17

Welcome!

It's time! The first "official" CSA pick-ups are this week, beginning with the Charlotte drop tomorrow evening, on-farm pick-up Tuesday afternoon, and at markets Saturday morning. I'd like to take this first CSA newsletter as an opportunity to thank everyone for their support of Lazy Heron Farm, and stepping up to try to do something good for your health and community. We are excited so many people are becoming friends of the farm!

A note on how these newsletters will generally go: we will give you a list of what we expect to have available that week (subject to minor changes), and some idea of how best to cook and store it. Then we will usually highlight some particular vegetable with a more in-depth recipe and include a bit of news from the farm. The list of vegetables will include what we are reasonably confident that we'll have enough for everyone. There might be a few surprises each week (or not), and it's possible something on the list will end up not being available.

A NOTE ON CHARLOTTE BOXES: especially on the small shares, we will generally have more types of vegetables harvested than what will be in your box, so you will see some items on the newsletter list you won't be getting. However, we will do our best to rotate vegetables in your boxes each week so you get a taste of everything, while keeping the favorites in. At the Charlotte drop, we will have a "take an item/leave an item" table to facilitate some flexibility in what you can bring home. For instance, small shares will generally not get herbs, since they don't exactly fill up your boxes or plates, but we will leave some on the table if you want to switch out. We are open to this system evolving too, once we see how it works.

PAYMENTS:  If you still need to pay for your share or are paying with a deposit, please bring cash or check to your pick-up.  Deposits and first month of payment are due this week.  Thank you! 

 

This week's harvest:

Kale: massage with lemon juice/other acid raw for salad, coat in oil and put in oven at high heat for chips, or saute with butter/oil and garlic
Collards: cook these down in a cast iron, traditionally with some pork
Lettuce mix, arugula, spicy salad mix: mix these up for salad. Our "spicy mix" is a blend of baby mustards, kale, turnip greens, and arugula. Mix these up if you prefer.
Head lettuce: cut it up for your salad
Scallions: use just like a regular onion. You can cut it all the way up the stalk
 

Store these in a reused plastic bag in the fridge. If they are starting to wilt when you take them out, dunk them in water and they will perk up.


Turnips: roast or slice thin and saute. Boil and mash like potatoes. You can cook down the greens too like collards.
Baby beets: as with turnips, or grate raw for salad.
Radishes: slice thin in salad or on sandwiches, or roast.
Kohlrabi: grows above ground, but can be treated similarly to a turnip. My favorite way is cutting into chunks, seasoning with salt and pepper, and grilling in foil.

Roots store best with greens off in the refrigerator.


Cilantro: cut up thin in your salad, add to rice, use generally in asian or latin dishes
Dill: cut up thin in salad, use on fish, pickle with it
Parsley: garnish salads, soups, and meat

We store herbs in a crock or jar with a thin layer of water on the bottom in the fridge (bottom of stems in water but not leaves).

If you have a particular way you like to cook any of these vegetables, let us know! We love to hear how people are using their share, and let other members know.

Farm Talk

We're now at the meeting point of spring crops coming in full-swing and summer crops being planted. We will be putting in some tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and more squash this week. Between harvests for market and now CSA, cultivating between rains to stay on top of the weeds, and finishing our summer crop soil preparations, we have been busy!

The chicks are now not so small, and they are out to pasture. Their "tractor" is moved twice a day currently. Of course I wish I had built it lighter, but we have figured out a decent system involving propping up the back with a hand truck and pulling a rope side-to-side at the front. I'll try to include a picture next week, so if you haven't been to the farm you have some idea of what I'm talking about.

Many folks have approached us at farmers markets or at Norwood's Arbor Day and commented on the most recent Stanly News and Press article on Lazy Heron, usually with some remark on the use of draft horses. I've heard dozens now and the most popular are:

  • that's a lot of work!
  • my family used horses/mules when I was growing up, but they sold the farm before I was really involved
  • I'm proud/excited about this!

We love that folks are interested in what we are doing and have something to say about it, so thanks!

Cousin Harper visiting the farm Easter weekend

Cousin Harper visiting the farm Easter weekend

Cats and pup 'helping' in the greenhouse on a rainy day

Cats and pup 'helping' in the greenhouse on a rainy day

Dusty Jo's morning yawn

Dusty Jo's morning yawn

Cultivating the first planting of corn

Cultivating the first planting of corn

Jo pup eats her kale, do you?

Jo pup eats her kale, do you?

Potato Field

Potato Field

Recipe:

This is about as simple a recipe as you can get, but it really showcases radishes' crunch and spicy sweetness.

Radishes with Bread and Butter
Slice some good quality crusty bread, spread with butter, and top with thinly sliced radishes and a sprinkle of salt.  That's it!  So simple, and so good.